A pill for lymphedema? Talking ubenimex’s potential with Dr. Quan of Eiger BioPharmaceuticals

How exciting would it be if we could just take a pill to get rid of our Lymphedema… great research ..thanks Alexa for keeping us up to date

The Lymphie Life

Living with lymphedema can be a real pill — but what if it could be treated with one?

Recent studies indicate it’s possible, and may even be a reality sooner than we think thanks to clinical trials of a drug called ubenimex.

Last summer I wrote about the ubenimex trials, which at the time of writing had just kicked off by dosing their first patient. The news generated a huge response from the lymphedema community — one of hope, excitement, and lots of curiosity — so I’m back with an update!

Photo courtesy Dr. Quan.

I recently had the incredible opportunity to speak with Dr. Joanne Quan, Chief Medical Officer at Eiger BioPharmaceuticals, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the research, development, and commercialization of therapies for orphan diseases; they are also sponsoring the ubenimex clinical trial.

Dr. Quan and I talked about the ubenimex trial, the Stanford…

View original post 1,393 more words

Research

imageFirst Patient Dosed in Secondary Lymphedema Study
Andrew Black
Published Online: Monday, Jul 25, 2016
30 700 5 4
Eiger BioPharmceuticals dosed the first patient in the Phase 2 Ultra Study of their drug Ubenimex in patients diagnosed with secondary lymphedema. The Ultra study is designed to assess the effectiveness of ubenimex blocking the production of Leukotriene B4 (LTB4).
Ultra Study
The study will evaluate the effects of ubenimex in patients with secondary lymphedema of the lower limb(s) who are optimized on physical therapies. The Ultra Study is a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 trial assessing 40 patients that will be randomized to receive either 150 mg of ubenimex or placebo three times a day over 24 weeks.

Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a naturally-occurring inflammatory substance known to be elevated in both preclinical models of secondary lymphedema as well as human lymphedema disease. Elevated LTB4 causes tissue inflammation and impaired lymphatic function. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of LTB4 promotes lymphatic repair and reverses lymphedema disease in treated animals.

Ubenimex is an oral, small-molecule inhibitor of leukotriene A4 hydrolase, which regulates the production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), an inflammatory mediator implicated in PAH. LTB4 is produced from leukocytes in response to inflammatory mediators and is able to induce the adhesion and activation of leukocytes on the endothelium, allowing them to bind to and cross it into the tissue.

Ubenimex is also currently being evaluated in a Phase 2 study for the treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH).
Secondary Lymphedema
Secondary lymphedema usually develops as a result of a lymph vessel blockage or interruption that alters the flow of lymph through the lymphatic system and can develop from an infection, malignancy, surgery, scar tissue formation, trauma, radiation, or other cancer treatment Radiation therapy can damage otherwise healthy lymph nodes and vessels, and can cause scarring of the lymphatic vessels which leads to fibrosis and subsequently diminish lymphatic flow.

 

Always excited to see any research into treating and curing Lymphedema …

Research… Lymphedema

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To find a cure for Lymphedema there needs to be research.. This information was sent to me by a reader via a comment and I thought it may be interesting to you all…

“There is a future treatment that I don’t see tracked in the past postings in your blog. I think it’s something that your readers may find intriguing. The potential treatment involves a form of retinoic acid. To put a very general label on retinoic acid, it is associated with vitamin A and as a layman I can’t embellish the specific differences. What is clear is that some experimentation is bringing to light favourable aspects of retinoic acid. A few papers have been published on beneficial aspects of a very specific variation of Retinoic acid called 9-CIS. In 2012 a published a paper in the American Heart Association publication Circulation showed a very favourable improvements in lymphatic function with mice as the recipients. That paper is available in its entirety at the first link below. At that time, I was surprised that this paper did not bring about a trial. Instead, there was much skepticism and a counter editorial published in that same issue of Circulation. It appears that the authors of that paper continued experimentation and recently published additional findings on 9-CIS. The second link is for the new paper which is only available as an abstract at this time. Again, the results for 9-CIS were quite positive and repeatable.

As you will see if you read the paper, 9-CIS is already approved by the FDA as a treatment for other diseases. This means an extensive amount of testing and data is available about this drug. Of course, there is uncertainty and risk with any human trial, but a drug that has already obtained certification for use on humans is not such an unknown. Because LE day approaches there may be a small spike in the topic. I often wonder if a grassroots request effort from LE sufferers would aid in accelerating trials for treatments for LE.”

Thanks Paul for this interesting information .. We hope that as time goes by there will be more and more research into a cure for Lymphedema… It is much needed by all those that live with this  24/7

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/125/7/872.abstract

http://journals.lww.com/annalsofsurgery/Abstract/publishahead/Prevention_

of_Postsurgical_Lymphedema_by_9_cis.97188.aspx

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3357957/

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The leg is getting smaller!!

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On Friday I went for my 18 month post Lymph Node Transfer surgery check up. I am part of a research program here in Sydney. I will have follow-up for at least two years so that the doctors here can make decisions on future LNT surgery. There is a definite opinion that LNT surgery does not work if there is fibrous tissue present, as the new nodes cannot break this down, but can clear fluid and protect against infections. Therefore it is very important for the doctors to decided who is suited for LNT and who is best suited for Lymphatic Liposuction surgery. From this view point, at this time, at Macquarie Uni Hospital they are performing more Lymphatic Liposuction than LNT surgery. There is talk of maybe doing a LNT on these liposuction patients in the future, but so far this has not happened. The hope would be that the LNT would help post Liposuction and stop the limb swelling again. At this time after Lymphatic liposuction compression garments need to be worn 24/7 otherwise the arm or leg will swell. Lymphatic Liposuction is different to the liposuction for weight loss as care is taken to preserve  the existing lymphatics. http://www.ilfconference.org/fibro-lipo-lympho-aspiration-flla-a-lymph-vessel-sparing-procedure-lvsp-for-advanced-stages-of-lymphedema/

So back to my appointment and measurements which have reduced since my visit in March 2014. One of the measurements that is used is the L-Dex reading. http://international.l-dex.com/what-is-l-dex/ This compares the good and bad leg and shows how much fluid is present in the LE leg in comparison to the good leg. In March my reading was 7.1 then June 5.1 and now it is down to 4.5 which is within normal range. This is very exciting as there seems to be a gradual improvement each visit. The doctor also felt the area at the back of my lower thigh had softened a lot, with the help of three weeks compression bandaging, MLD and Compression Garments. I have also had no infections since the surgery 18 months ago so that is a huge plus for me. I am back in a pool without fear if infection which I am very happy about. If this surgery keeps my leg in the best state possible then that is a big improvement, as my fear was always that it could get worse and worse.

I have not been writing so many updates on my own progress as there has been little to say!!! It is a slow and steady reduction which takes lots of patience!!  Will I ever not wear compression?? Only time will tell… Next appointment will be March 2015, my two-year anniversary. I will be having an MRI and Ultrasound done then but I declined another Lymphasyntagraph!! No more injections between toes needed!!

If anyone else has an update to share then send this news via email to helenbrd@bigpond.net.au and I will create a post… As always sharing helps everyone… Helen

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Brooklyn Bridge walk with The Lymphatic Education and Research Network

Walking the Brooklyn Bridge

Walking the Brooklyn Bridge

I was invited by the Lymphatic Education and Research Network to write a guest post on the importance of education and research for Lymphedema and the funds that are needed  to support their goals. On September 14th there will be a sponsored walk across the Brooklyn Bridge which is hoping to raise $60,000.

This is a link to my post…..
http://lymphaticnetwork.org/news-events/lymphedema-a-light-in-the-darkness-by-helen-bonynge

This is a link to more information about the day and how you can help raise much-needed funds…

http://lymphatic.donorpages.com/LYMPHWALK2014/

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Feel free to share with others. It can be distributed via social media, reblogged or added to websites. Please do not change the original content and provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name and a link to this blog.
https://lymphnodetransplant.wordpress.com/ Thanks

Help to guide the growth of lymphatic channels

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I am always so excited with any new research to help Lymphoedema, even if I find it difficult to understand it is truly wonderful to see!!! This article was sent to me about “artificial” tissue that can be used during a Lymph node transfer to help in the development of Lymphatic Channels. It has been tested by Dr Corrine Becker and maybe available for use in 2015. “We anticipate that BioBridge will initially be used as an adjunct to Vascularized Lymph Node Transfer, an existing surgical procedure used for treating lymphedema. Our expectation is that BioBridge will help improve the outcome of this procedure. We are working closely with Dr. Corinne Becker, who pioneered this surgical procedure.” Quote from Greg King

Interview with Greg King, COO of Fibralign, Winner of 2014 MedTech Innovator

by JUSTIN BARAD on Jul 17, 2014 • 3:31 pm

Fibralign, a startup medical device company, just took home the grand prize in the 2014 MedTech Innovator competition, winning over 267 other startups. Their product, Biobridge, is a possible cure for secondary lymphedema, a debilitating disease with few available treatment options. Secondary lymphedema describes a condition in which the lymph system, which is responsible for removing extracellular fluid, is disrupted, resulting in the accumulation of extracellular fluid. This can lead to swelling in the extremities, which can cause significant discomfort and is cosmetically unappealing. This condition is most commonly associated with breast cancer patients who sometimes must undergo aggressive lymph node dissections in the armpit in order to stage their cancer, but it can happen in any condition in which the lymph system has been disrupted.

BioBridge

BioBridge

The Biobridge is an implant that has been shown to be able to guide the growth of new lymph channels. This technology can be used as an adjunct to existing treatments for the condition to hopefully improve outcomes.

The product itself is a collagen scaffold with very unique properties. “Scaffold” is a term used in tissue engineering that describes a three-dimensional material that encourages cells to attach and grow along its microscopic structure. While collagen scaffolds are not particularly unique, the Biobridge uses a novel fabrication method that gives it a distinctive three-dimensional structure that is very similar to collagen structures found within the body itself.

We had a chance to sit down with Greg King, the COO of Fibralign, to ask him some questions about this very exciting technology.

Justin Barad, Medgadget: Can you discuss the development of your technology? How did it start and when did you start seeing its potential?

Greg King: Our founders had a “penicillin moment” working in a Stanford Lab when they found that previously developed technology for working with liquid crystal materials used in the flat panel display industry could be applied to several biomaterials including collagen in a liquid crystal state to form 3D scaffolds. When they saw the resulting structure in the AFM image shown below they recognized that they had a breakthrough discovery. The image was like the skin scaffold of a newborn, with bundles of highly aligned collagen fibrils. As far as we know, this was never produced before in a lab. They were able to take collagen, a material commonly used for the past 30 years in various cosmetic and surgical applications, and fabricate scaffolds that mimicked different types of human tissue at the micro structural level. They started working with different research groups on a wide range of high-value tissue applications and used this experience to develop the core technology. They determined rather quickly that this was a fundamental technology that offered a large design space for addressing application requirements.

Medgadget: Can you tell us a little bit about when and how your company was founded?

Greg King: The company was founded in 2007 by Michael Paukshto, David McMurtry, Yuri Bobrov, George Martin and Eric Sabelman. They early years were lean, surviving primarily on sweat equity and some modest angel funding. During this time, the team developed its core technology, fabricated initial prototypes and secured an IP position and developed the manufacturing approach for scaling commercially. At the end of 2012, the Company made a business decision to focus on lymphedema as the initial product, expanded the core team and then moved from an incubator to a dedicated lab space with a cleanroom to support this development effort. Fibralign also benefited from grants from the DoD and NSF to support a large animal study and develop production tools for making its initial product. Can you tell us a little bit more exactly how BioBridge is used to treat secondary lymphedema? What results have you had so far in your animal studies?Secondary lymphedema can occur when the body’s lymphatic system is compromised from a trauma. In western countries this most commonly occurs after aggressive cancer treatments, involving surgery and radiation therapy, but it can also occur from infections and other injuries. This can disrupt the flow of lymphatic fluid in the affected limb that leads to swelling, great discomfort and serious infections.BioBridge is a bundle of small collagen fibrils aligned in one direction. It is made from medical-grade collagen and has been designed to support and repair the diseased tissue area, allowing new lymphatic vessels can form in the direction of BioBridge and restore function.In our successfully completed large animal study, we were able to show that new lymphatic vessels formed in diseased areas and about a 60% reduction in accumulated fluid only three months after BioBridge implantation. This compared to the control group that did not get BioBridge and showed no improvement.

Medgadget: What kind of effect will winning Medtech Innovator have on your company?

Greg King: We hope it helps attract attention needed for Fibralign to address this opportunity, providing visibility to investors, stakeholders and the broader community. We need to build awareness of what we’re doing to help treat this horrible and neglected disease, which impacts millions of people and currently has no cure.

Medgadget: Do you have any rough estimate when your product might come to market?

Greg King: We expect to have product in the market in 2015

Medgadget: What sort of clinical applications to you envision for the near future?

Greg King: We anticipate that BioBridge will initially be used as an adjunct to Vascularized Lymph Node Transfer, an existing surgical procedure used for treating lymphedema. Our expectation is that BioBridge will help improve the outcome of this procedure. We are working closely with Dr. Corinne Becker, who pioneered this surgical procedure.

Medgadget: Do you have any advice for our readers, many of whom are aspiring medical innovators and entrepreneurs?

Greg King: Pick something you’re passionate about because it will consume you and require tremendous energy to get anywhere. So make sure you like what you’re doing. Also get out and talk to your expected customers and test your hypothesis and product plans as early and often as you can. It sounds cliché, but this for some reason isn’t done enough in startups and in biotech in particular. Go out and validate your market opportunity before you commit effort and resources!

Greg King

Greg King

http://www.medgadget.com/2014/07/interview-with-greg-king-coo-of-fibralign-winner-of-2014-medtech-innovator.html

Feel free to share with others. It can be distributed via social media, reblogged or added to websites. Please do not change the original content and provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name and a link to this blog.
https://lymphnodetransplant.wordpress.com/ Thanks

Research from Australia which may help those with Lymphoedema

Gene discovery points to lymphatic disease and cancer therapy

This is a link to a television program shown on Chanel 7 about the work that is being done at the University of Queensland on the lymphatics system.

These are links to three articles about the research

http://www.imb.uq.edu.au/index.html?page=211438&pid=12193

http://www.imb.uq.edu.au/index.html?page=210555&pid=12193

http://www.imb.uq.edu.au/ben-hogan

Wonderful to see this research happening in Australia which could benefit those with Lymphoedema and also help to stop the spread of cancer from a primary growth.. Thanks to the University of Queensland for sharing this news..

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Research from Japan brings hope……. Medication to treat Lymphedema!

imageThese are copies of two press releases sent out by Pharmaceutical company AnGes MG, Inc in 2012. One is to patent the medication Collategene for treatment of Lymphedema, the other is to initiate the first world trials on Gene therapy (Collategene) for Lymphedema, these trial are initially for Primary Lymphedema. I do not pretend to understand how this all works! There is so little help for Primary Lymphedema as few are suited to lymph node transfer surgery due to lack of nodes in their bodies, which means there is no safe area to harvest nodes to transfer, which leaves liposuction and debulking procedures.

I do note however, that these press releases state they have also worked out how many people have Lymphedema world-wide, and are thinking about how much profit can be made from this drug!! Well I guess that is ok if it has pushed them into putting their money into research, at last, for Lymphedema, as it has been so neglected  in the past. We hope that years to come people will benefit from this medication. It seems like a dream now but there is always hope.
imageFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 1, 2012 AnGes MG, Inc.

New Medical Use Patent for HGF Granted in Japan for Lymphedema

AnGes MG, Inc. (“AnGes”) is pleased to announce that a medical use patent has been granted in Japan for HGF plasmid drug which promotes lymphangiogenesis, and the Patent Gazette (JP5036057) has been issued.
The patented invention features therapeutic agents which contain HGF plasmid as an active ingredient and promote lymphangiogenesis, and is administered directly into the affected or peripheral area by intramuscular injection. This patent, along with the previously granted patent JP4111993 for therapeutic agents that prevent or treat lymphedema, protects the new treatment of lymphedema using HGF plasmid from various aspects.
Lymphedema is an intractable disease in which impaired lymphatic system causes severe swelling and fluid retention in limbs by preventing lymphatic fluid from returning to lymph vessels. There are two types of lymphedema: 1) “primary lymphedema” which the pathogenesis is unknown, and 2) “secondary lymphedema” which occurs due to aftereffects of lymph node dissection in e.g. cancer surgery. The existing treatment for lymphedema is mainly focused on complex decongestive therapy by massaging the affected limbs and using compression garments. However, this treatment is symptomatic and should be continued throughout the life. Furthermore, there has been an increase in lymphedema cases among elderly patients in recent years who are unable to perform physical treatment on their own. For these reasons, a development of a new treatment for lymphedema is highly desired.
AnGes has been developing HGF plasmid “Collatege®” for the treatment of Critical Limb Ischemia and now started the research development of lymphedema treatment utilizing Collategene®’s action to promote lymph vessel formation. The confirmation was received from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) on July 18, 2012 that clinical trial plan of Collategene® in lymphedema complies with the guideline for confirmation application, and AnGes’s IND application for Collategene® as a treatment for lymphedema was accepted by Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) on July 30. AnGes is now taking necessary procedures to initiate the clinical trial.
The grant of this patent enables AnGes to further strengthen the new treatment approach for Lymphedema using HGF plasmid, and strongly supports the development project for a long-term. AnGes strives to obtain medical use patents for other applications of HGF plasmid in order to further strengthen its patent network.
This trend will have no effect on the business performance for the fiscal year of 2012. ###
Disclaimer: This is a translation of the news release posted in Japanese. In case of any deviations between the two language versions, the original document in Japanese shall take precedence.
AnGesMG,Inc.
Corporate Communications TEL:+81-3-5730-2461, FAX:+81-3-5730-2635 http://www.anges-mg.com Email:info@anges-mg.com

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

AnGes MG Submits an IND Application for CollategeneTM (HGF DNA Plasmid)

July 30, 2012 AnGes MG, Inc.

– Initiation of the World’s First Clinical Trial on Gene Therapy for Lymphedema –

AnGes MG, Inc. (“AnGes”) announced today that their IND application for CollategeneTM (HGF DNA Plasmid) as a treatment for primary lymphedema has been accepted by Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA).
The clinical trial is planned to ensure Proof of Concept (POC) study for primary lymphedema and is the first Phase I/II trial to be conducted with patients. In this trial study, CollategeneTM will be administered intramuscularly to patient’s affected legs which are swollen by more than 20% compared to the healthy legs, and the changes to the volume of edema will be assessed to investigate safety and efficacy of CollategeneTM.
Lymphedema is an intractable disease in which compromised lymphatic system causes severe swelling and fluid retention in limbs by preventing lymphatic fluid from returning to lymph vessels. There are two types of lymphedema: 1) “primary lymphedema” which the pathogenesis is unidentified, and 2) “secondary lymphedema” which occurs due to aftereffects of lymph node dissection in e.g. cancer surgery. The existing treatment for lymphedema is mainly focused on complex decongestive therapy by massaging the affected limbs and using compression garments. However, this treatment is symptomatic and should be continued throughout the life. Furtheremore, there has been an increase in lymphedema cases among elderly patients in recent years who are unable to perform physical treatment on their own. For these reasons, a development of a new treatment for lymphedema is highly desired.
Development for the treatment of Critical Limb Ischemia using CollategeneTM has been ongoing at AnGes and now the research development of lymphedema treatment utilizing CollategeneTM’s action to promote lymph vessel formation has begun. With the confirmation received from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) on July 18, 2012 that clinical trial plan of CollategeneTM in lymphedema complies with the guideline for confirmation application, AnGes is ready to initiate the clinical trial for lymphedema treatment with CollategeneTM, the world’s first effort in treating lymphedema utilizing lymph vessel groth function. That being said, CollategeneTM has a potential to become a radical treatment.
AnGes plans to initiate the clinical trial promptly after taking necessary procedures, and strive to pursue the development in order to provide the new treatment for patients who suffer from lymphedema.
Once the company completes the POC clinical trial with patients with primary lymphedema, AnGes plans to start with the development for secondary lymphedema. It is reported that secondary lymphedema occurs in about 30% of patients who underwent uterus cancer surgery, and 50% of patients who underwent breast cancer surgery. Based on these figures, it is estimated that more than 1 million patients are suffering from lymphedema in seven major industrialized nations, with an approximate market size of 50 billion yen a year.
This trend will have no effect on the business performance for the fiscal year of 2012.
(Reference)
Gene Medicine
###
A drug which utilizes gene or a part of gene as active ingredient.
HGF(Hepatocyte Growth Factor)
A growth factor developed from hepatocytes; in addition to blood vessel regeneration, it initiates various processes necessary for tissue / organ regeneration during organ formation (organogenesis).
Lymphedema
Lymphedema is an intractable disease in which compromised lymphatic system causes severe edema in limbs by preventing tissue fluid from going back to lymph vessel, causing it to be retained under the skin. There are two types of lymphedema; 1) “primary lymphedema” which the pathogenesis is unidentified, and 2) “secondary lymphedema” which occurs due to aftereffects of lymph node dissection in cancer surgery, etc. There is no effective treatment method established for lymphedema while it chronically progresses and is exacerbated over time, declining patients’ quality of life.
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Narrowed or blocked peripheral blood vessels in the four limbs causes ischemic condition in muscle and skin tissues, with the following symptoms: a feeling of paralysis, coldness, intermittent claudication, ulcer of lower limbs (thrombic disease) or rest pain. It includes arteriosclerosis obliterans and Buerger’s disease.
Proof of Concept (POC)
A proof of concept (POC) is a demonstration to verify that a fundamental finding or concept has the real-world application. In development of drugs, POC refers to examination of a drug candidate compound for a certain disease in real patients after its effect was indicated in animal models.
Disclaimer: This is a translation of the news release posted in Japanese. In case of any deviations between the two language versions, the original document in Japanese shall take precedence.

AnGesMG,Inc.
Corporate Communications TEL:+81-3-5730-2480, FAX:+81-3-5730-2676 http://www.anges-mg.com Email:info@anges-mg.com

AnGes has the pharmaceutical company Vical as it’s representative for the United States.

“Collategene™
AnGes has applied Vical’s technologies to the local delivery of a gene that encodes an angiogenic growth factor that promotes the growth of blood vessels. AnGes announced that it had reached agreement with the FDA regarding a Special Protocol Assessment for a Phase 3 clinical trial of its angiogenesis product, Collategene™ (HGF plasmid), and that the FDA has granted “Fast Track” designation to Collategene™ as a treatment for critical limb ischemia (CLI), the severest form of PAD. AnGes is poised to start a global Phase 3 clinical trial of Collategene™ in patients with CLI. AnGes is also conducting a Phase 1/2 study for the treatment of primary lymphedema in Japan, for which the results are expected in the latter half of 2014.” .. Infomation from the Vical web site… http://www.vical.com/About-Us/overview/default.aspx

June 6, 2014 AnGes MG, Inc.
Grant Amount for “2013 Venture Aid Program to Promote Practical Application of Innovation” Confirmed by NEDO
Regarding CollategeneR (DNA Plasmid with HGF Gene) Lymphedema Project
AnGes MG, Inc. (“AnGes”) announced that the grant amount has been confirmed for the “2013 Venture Aid Program to Promote Practical Application of Innovation” by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). As announced by AnGes on May 15, 2014, the CollategeneR lymphedema project was selected for NEDO‘s program.
Project name: Grant amout: Period:
Clinical Development of Lymphedema Treatment Drug using HGF Plasmid
79,808,000 Yen
(Maximum amount equivalent to two-thirds of actual project costs) May 29, 2014 to February 28, 2015
Details of the program are as announced in the press release “CollategeneR (DNA Plasmid with HGF Gene) Lymphedema Project Selected for NEDO’s Venture Aid Program” on May 15, 2014.
The grant money is expected during the fiscal year ending December 2015, and this will have no effect on the business performance for the fiscal year 2014.
###
Disclaimer: This is a translation of the news release posted in Japanese. In case of any deviations between the two language versions, the original document in Japanese shall take precedence.

AnGesMG, Inc.
Corporate Communications TEL:+81-3-5730-2641, FAX:+81-3-5730-2635 http://www.anges-mg.com

More info… http://www.anges-mg.com/en/project/proj_develop.html
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Feel free to share with others. It can be distributed via social media, reblogged or added to websites. Please do not change the original content and provide appropriate credit by including a link to this blog.
https://lymphnodetransplant.wordpress.com/ Thanks

Interesting Research articles

imageThese are two interesting articles from Toronto Physiotherapy written by Ryan Davey… Thanks for posting on LinkedIn so I was able to find them!! I am sure many would be interested in a medication that would help Lymphedema and also the research into why some experience weight gain with Lymphedema.. Always looking for articles that step into the future for Lymphedema and shine a light of hope on improvements to treatment.

http://torontophysiotherapy.ca/rehab-science-blog/cilostazol-holds-promise-for-treating-lymphedema/

http://torontophysiotherapy.ca/rehab-science-blog/untreated-lymphedema-promotes-weight-gain-by-altering-stem-cells/

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Ryan Davey

Ryan Davey earned a PhD in Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, where he specialized in stem cells and regenerative medicine. While not writing and working with Toronto Physiotherapy, Ryan consults in the field of biotechnology.

Thanks to Toronto Physiotherapy for posting this information..

Toronto Physiotherapy
P. 416.792.5115
F. 647.436.1926
info@TorontoPhysiotherapy.ca