Exercise to help your lymphatics..

From time to time I am asked by people if they can write an article for this blog, some I refuse and others I accept. This is an article about Rebounding as a way to help the lymphatics. I was once told that 15 minutes a day jumping on a mini trampoline would be great for my lymphedema. I gave it a go and was amazed that it was hard work!!  But it felt good … I am aware that some of you would not be able to do this exercise but for others it is something different to do at home. I think you can also get mini trampolines with a handle for support.

https://www.rebounderzone.com/blogs/rz-blog/112881093-10-ways-rebounding-improves-your-lymphatic-health

 

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Rebounding & your Lymph System … Health Benefits Galore!

As you may know, your lymph system plays a vital role in your body’s ability to fight disease and self-maintenance. But, unlike your circulatory system, there is no “motor” to get your lymph system revved up and your lymph moving. There are various self-care methods you can use to stimulate your lymph, including manual lymph drainage, skincare, and exercise. Exercise is extremely important, as not only does it benefit your overall health, but can help relieve some of they symptoms of lymphedema and other lymphatic disorders. If you are living with lymphedema, make your exercise time count with efficient exercises that impact your lymph system. Lymph in your body flows vertically, meaning traditional exercises such as running won’t be as effective as you would like with getting your lymph moving. Focus on vertically oriented activities that use the force of gravity, such as jumping jacks and rebounding. Rebounding is just a fancy term for bouncing on a trampoline, and it can have tremendous benefits including increasing your lymph flow and improving your overall health. In this infographic from Rebounder Zone, you can see the wide-ranging positive impact rebounding can create for your body. Don’t let a sluggish lymph system prevent you from living the active life you want and enjoying the health you deserve!
Leonard J. Parker III
Business Development Manager
Rebounder Zone
http://www.rebounderzone.com
832-356-8251

Thank you so much! :)

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Thank you, thank you so much for all the support you have given me in the creation of my New Blog, it has been just amazing with over 500 views in just one day. I have also had many, many beautiful messages of support and encouragment which have really lifted me. When I started to blog I had no idea how it would go, if there would be any interest but it has spread across the world and is now read in 127 countries, truly amazing. There have been nearing 100,000 views and 272 posts. Many if you have created posts for me and I hope you continue to do so. Just email me at helenbrd@bigpond.net.au to share your story. I would still love to hear from someone who has had the lymphatic lyposuction, SAPL proceedure.

I would also like to ask everyone no matter where you live to encourage your goverment to give support to Lymohoedema. It has been far to long that Lymphoedema has been ignored by goverment health programs. Everyone should have access to the treatment that they need and the garments that they need to wear. The burden should not fall to the patient, in which case many do not get the care that they need and the Lymphoedema becomes worse and worse. Please give Lymphoedema and voice, a loud voice. Lets hope that more high profile people like #Kathy Bates start to speak out instead of hiding their problem. We have become a “cyber community” of fellow lymphies who are there to connect and support each other, we are no longer alone or silent.

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Feel free to share with others. It can be distributed via social media, reblogged or added to websites. Please do not change the original content and provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name and a link to this blog.
https://lymphnodetransplant.wordpress.com/ Thanks

It is not just a little bit of swelling!! Lymphoedema

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This is a guest post that I did for the blog “Nancy’s Point”  …  I feel it is important to repost it to continue to build awareness and understanding of the problems associated with Lymphoedema. Nancy writes a wonderful blog on her experience with Breast Cancer and as we know Lymphoedema can be a side effect of Breast Cancer treatment. In fact Lymphoedema can be a side effect of any cancer treatment where lymph nodes are removed. There is also Primary Lymphoedema where people are born with a weakness in their lymphatic system, issues can arise at birth or later in life. Lymphoedema is often misunderstood and the impact on quality of life is often unknown. I hope this post brings better understanding.

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It is not just a bit of swelling! Lymphedema

I am very excited to have been invited by Nancy to write a guest post on Lymphedema, as March is Lymphedema Awareness Month. Approximately 10 million Americans and 100 million worldwide suffer from Lymphedema, as stated by the Lymphatic Education and Research network this year, but there is still much ignorance, misdiagnosis and misunderstanding around this condition. In this post I will be writing about Secondary Lymphedema but we should also acknowledge those with Primary Lymphedema who were born lacking important Lymph Nodes in parts of their bodies. Even though so many people suffer from Lymphedema, few know about it, unless they have it themselves or know someone.

My journey with Lymphedema started at the end of my treatment for Uterine cancer 12 years ago and like many, the removal of Lymph nodes and follow-up radiation destroyed part of my lymphatic system, leading to swelling, discomfort, pain, lack of mobility and infections. I remember seeing my surgeon before my radical hysterectomy, I was concerned over the removal of the lymph nodes, as I felt I still needed them!! His response was, ” It is better than being dead!” Needless to say that was the end of that conversation. During surgery I had 22 nodes removed in the groin area and 28 sessions of pelvic radiation. The Lymphedema came up as soon as I finished treatment. We have between 600 and 700 lymph nodes in our body, but when crucial nodes are removed, (radiation and surgical scarring also destroy the surrounding lymphatic vessels) fluid will collect in the limb and cause Lymphedema.

Three litres of fluid a day is removed from the tissues via the lymphatic system and passed into the circulatory system. The lymphatics are the “garbage disposal system” of the body with the lymph nodes acting as a “Cleansing system,” purifying, filtering, destroying bacteria and toxins. It is however, sadly the way that cancerous cells spread to other parts of the body, hence their removal during treatment. The lymphatics are an important part of the immune system and removal of nodes leaves one vulnerable to infection in that area. Unlike the vascular system the Lymphatic system requires the movement of muscles to push the flow of lymph through the body, there is no heart pumping as in blood flow.

When my leg first started to swell I was really scared, it felt like a tree trunk, heavy, uncomfortable,unsightly, my normal clothes would not fit and I felt self-conscious. Fortunately a friend told me about a workshop that was being held at Westmead hospital in Sydney. There I found much-needed help, a rehabilitation hospital, Mt Wilga in Hornsby, that specialised in treating Lymphedema. There followed five weeks of Complex Bandaging, Manual Lymph Drainage and Laser. My leg was thickly bandaged like having a plaster cast on. These were removed only to shower, which I did at the hospital, I drove each day from home for this treatment. At the end of five weeks my leg had reduced in size to just a little bigger than my good leg. I was then measured for a compression garment, from waist to ankle on the bad leg and to the knee on the good leg, a real passion killer!! I felt miserable. However over the years I spent a great deal of time walking in water which really helped the swelling, as it acts as a natural compression. Exercise is essential to help the lymphatics, as they need movement to function, elevating the leg whenever possible, raising the end of the bed all helped and eventually I was able to convert to just a compression stocking on the bad leg. Importantly when ever I fly however I wear compression tights to protect both legs from further damage. Though I have never done it myself yoga is very good for helping Lymphedema.

This would have all been manageable, but I experienced repeat infections, even though I was very careful to look after my leg well. These infections called Cellulitus, caused by the lack of “cleansing” nodes, would come up in half an hour and require a trip straight to hospital for intravenous antibiotics for ten days. Needless to say this impacted on my work and home life but we managed. That was until 2010 when an infection spread to my heart and I was diagnosed with Pericarditis. Fluid was removed from around the heart and I had four weeks of strong antibiotics via a PICC line, as it is almost impossible to find a good vein in my arms due to previous treatment.

After this I started to look for alternative treatments for the Lymphedema. Something that would maybe cure the Lymphedema or lessen the infections. I found out about Dr Corrine Becker, who pioneered Lymph Node Transfers in Paris, and sent her an email to ask if any Doctors in Australia did this surgery. She had trained many doctors in the US and elsewhere but not Australia. I continued to send out emails to the various Lymphedema specialists. One day a reply came inviting me to join a research program at Macquarie University Hospital in Sydney, started by Prof. Boyages, who is a Breast cancer specialist. As is the case overseas much of the research into surgical intervention for Lymphedema is funded by the Breast Cancer community, due to the high incidence of Lymphedema in the arms of patients after treatment for Breast cancer. He and other doctors wanted to find a way of helping patients with arm Lymphedema. They realised that this was not just about a “little bit of swelling”, but a life changing side effect of treatment that was affecting patients, mentally and physically, as well as becoming a financial burden for the rest of their lives. In some cases surgery is now being done as part of the reconstructive process, as the sooner new nodes are put into the arm, the better the response. Nodes in this case are often taken from the groin and placed in the armpit. Other patients may have it done years after the onset of Lymphedema and may also need some liposuction to remove stubborn fibrotic areas. There has been great success in improving the arms of these patients and giving them a better quality of life. Surgery for Lymphedema of the legs is more recent and takes longer to see results. In some cases two transfers are needed to groin and lower leg. For a patient to be eligible for LNT to arm or leg they need to be assessed by a surgical Lymphedema specialist. Their Lymphatic system would be mapped to find suitable nodes to harvested and the best position for placement to get maximum results.

March 14th 2013 I had the first leg Lymph Node transfer in Australia, Lymph nodes were taken from my neck and placed in my left knee. I started to create a blog about this, as I felt it needed to be documented. I called it “My Lymph Node Transplant,” it has now grown to include many articles, videos and stories that I feel will help people manage their Lymphedema. It is also a great resource for those who are having Lymph Node Transfers or other surgery world-wide for Lymphedema, in both arms and legs, as this is now becoming more common. My leg is doing well a year later the nodes are growing but it is a slow process, so far I have had no infections and that makes me very happy!! The hope is that as the surgeons become more experienced this will become a viable treatment for Lymphedema.

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Copyright © 2013-2014 by Helensamia. All rights Reserved.

Feel free to share with others. It can be distributed via social media, reblogged or added to websites. Please do not change the original content and provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name and a link to this blog.
https://lymphnodetransplant.wordpress.com/ Thanks

Research from Australia which may help those with Lymphoedema

Gene discovery points to lymphatic disease and cancer therapy

This is a link to a television program shown on Chanel 7 about the work that is being done at the University of Queensland on the lymphatics system.

These are links to three articles about the research

http://www.imb.uq.edu.au/index.html?page=211438&pid=12193

http://www.imb.uq.edu.au/index.html?page=210555&pid=12193

http://www.imb.uq.edu.au/ben-hogan

Wonderful to see this research happening in Australia which could benefit those with Lymphoedema and also help to stop the spread of cancer from a primary growth.. Thanks to the University of Queensland for sharing this news..

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A Journey With A Purpose. . .

Hi Elizabeth I am reblogging this to show people the difficulties of living with Lymphedema. I also want to share your words of warning about the sun and checking your skin regularly. In Australia with our harsh climate this is a very real problem… Thanks for your honest account right down to the shower chair…

Dr Chang… Improvements in microsurgery

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This is a link from an article published in October 2013. It is about Dr Chang’s work in the USA improving microsurgery for Lymphedema…

Supermicrosurgery: A New Way to Open Clogged Drains

http://cancerconversations.uchospitals.edu/featured/supermicrosurgery-a-new-way-to-open-clogged-drains/

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Giving my support to Research Funding ……

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This is the letter that is to go out to Alumni of Macquarie University to raise funds, for equipment to improve imaging of the Lymphatic system, prior to a Lymph node Transfer… Lets hope they raise the money they need and that my little story will allow people to understand the need for research in this area.. Will let you all know how  this goes!!

There is also an online link available from 18th November…
This is the link to the fund-raising appeal if anyone would like to donate
Thanks
http://awc.alumni.mq.edu.au/s/1404/give/start.aspx?sid=1404&gid=1&pgid=1176&sitebuilder=1&contentbuilder=1

A Simple exercise to aid the Lymphatics… Video

Simple exercise to stimulate the Lymphatic system  Click on this link to view.

Shan, at Shan therapy created this video to demonstrate a simple exercise to stimulate the Lymphatics. This can be done very easily on waking, before bed and at other times to get the system moving. This can add a bit of variety to the daily routine!! Please click on the link to view. Thanks Shan for this.

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Artificial Lymph Nodes????

Lymphatic vessel

Lymphatic vessel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I wonder if in the future Artificial Lymph nodes could be created….. Imagine the possibilities that could open up for the treatment of all types of Lymphoedema…it is good to see that research is being done in this area….

The Sunnybrook Research Institute

“The lymphatic research group is part of the biological sciences platform and the Brain Sciences Research Program at Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI). Our principal investigator, Dr. Miles Johnston, has studied the lymphatic circulatory system for over 30 years.

We are investigating several issues related to the relationship between lymphatic vessels and disease, including:

The role of lymphatic injury in the generation of post-surgical lymphedema in breast cancer.

We are fully affiliated with the University of Toronto.

The loss of the lymph nodes in cancer patients may have a much more negative impact on tissue fluid balance than has been considered in the past. Available evidence suggests that the absorption of protein-free water into the capillaries of the nodes has an important role in the regulation of pressure and volume in downstream anatomical elements of the lymphatic system. The autologous transplantation of lymph nodes into the surgical resection site could facilitate the restoration of normal lymph transport in the affected limb. However, the removal of a normal lymph node could lead to donor site morbidity.

We are investigating the possibility of developing an artificial lymph node that could be implanted into the surgical resection site. We are attempting to create an implant that will stimulate new blood vessel and lymphatic vessel growth resulting in the recreation of an intact lymphatic network.

Current therapeutic measures are applied to patients with entrenched edema and the outcome is often unsatisfactory. In the case of breast cancer-related post-surgical lymphedema, the timeline of the disorder can be linked to the removal of lymph nodes. Therefore, it is likely that a higher success rate may be achieved with treatment started early (lymph node transplantation or its artificial equivalent) since the chronic sequel of events leading to lymphedema might be prevented”.... Ref.. Sunnybrook Research Institute website

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