Lymphedema and Compression

Sharing Karens story and her latest update as to how well she is going with the treatment of the Lymphedema… There was a time when she could not wear compression garments due to the size and shape of her legs… However Karen is now going really well it is so good to see.. Thank you Karen as always for sharing your story.. It shows that there is hope for everyone with Lymphedema. Take care

lymphedemaandme

I am not a person who likes to make absolute statements. I have always believed that what works for one person with lymphedema will not always work with someone else with lymphedema. Every person is unique.

BUT I am now going to say that I now believe that compression garments or wraps is the key to living with lymphedema. I have primary lymphedema and I have lived all of my life with it (well officially  the lymphedema didn’t show until puberty) and I have had a lot of lymphedema pain for the last 25 years. In the last few months I was able to have treatment where I was wrapped with Coban wraps and my legs were finally to a shape where I could actually wear compression stockings. WooHoo!!! I have not had lymphedema pain since I started wearing my compression stockings (actually since I started being wrapped with the Coban…

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Lymphedema: a Name for 33 year’s worth of questions.

A great post about Primary Lymphedema and its diagnosis and treatment ..thanks Laura for sharing your experience so others may learn from it …

Expressions of Laura Ashley

This month, I began a journey that I never thought I was prepared for. Upon realizing that I was in my 30’s and having never really addressed why my legs always looked puffy or swollen, I thought I’d go to the doctor. I didn’t really know where to start, so I went to the foot doctor. As part of their intake session, they took an xray of my foot. When I met with the doctor, he looked at my foot movement, my walk and gait, and range of motion. But he said my bones were fine. Even my foot, which he said was not a “flat foot” but a type of flatter foot, was fine. But he said he thought I had lymphedema because of the swelling and that he’d refer me to a lymphedema specialist. I left with a prescription for low level compression wear and some online resources…

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Research

imageFirst Patient Dosed in Secondary Lymphedema Study
Andrew Black
Published Online: Monday, Jul 25, 2016
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Eiger BioPharmceuticals dosed the first patient in the Phase 2 Ultra Study of their drug Ubenimex in patients diagnosed with secondary lymphedema. The Ultra study is designed to assess the effectiveness of ubenimex blocking the production of Leukotriene B4 (LTB4).
Ultra Study
The study will evaluate the effects of ubenimex in patients with secondary lymphedema of the lower limb(s) who are optimized on physical therapies. The Ultra Study is a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 trial assessing 40 patients that will be randomized to receive either 150 mg of ubenimex or placebo three times a day over 24 weeks.

Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a naturally-occurring inflammatory substance known to be elevated in both preclinical models of secondary lymphedema as well as human lymphedema disease. Elevated LTB4 causes tissue inflammation and impaired lymphatic function. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of LTB4 promotes lymphatic repair and reverses lymphedema disease in treated animals.

Ubenimex is an oral, small-molecule inhibitor of leukotriene A4 hydrolase, which regulates the production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), an inflammatory mediator implicated in PAH. LTB4 is produced from leukocytes in response to inflammatory mediators and is able to induce the adhesion and activation of leukocytes on the endothelium, allowing them to bind to and cross it into the tissue.

Ubenimex is also currently being evaluated in a Phase 2 study for the treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH).
Secondary Lymphedema
Secondary lymphedema usually develops as a result of a lymph vessel blockage or interruption that alters the flow of lymph through the lymphatic system and can develop from an infection, malignancy, surgery, scar tissue formation, trauma, radiation, or other cancer treatment Radiation therapy can damage otherwise healthy lymph nodes and vessels, and can cause scarring of the lymphatic vessels which leads to fibrosis and subsequently diminish lymphatic flow.

 

Always excited to see any research into treating and curing Lymphedema …