Cindy’s update re measurements…

imageThis is an update from Cindy to make it clear how much work is needed both pre and post surgery to support the nodes while they grow. The measurements start from two years prior to surgery.

“I don’t want there to be any confusion over my leg volume and for anyone to think the size of my leg changed overnight, it didn’t! For eleven months before surgery I was diligent in getting my leg ready, compression 24/7, using my pump, MLD 3 times a week and I lost approximately 10 pounds in weight. In January 2014, I weighed 123-127(pounds), today I weigh around 115-117 (I’m 5’4″).

We do not have LDex readings, everything is done by measurements.
In June 2012, my leg volume was 9347, the volume of oedema was 674.
In January 2014, leg volume was 9766, volume of oedema was 1056.
On December 9, 2014 leg volume was 7801, volume of oedema was 220.
On August 4, 2015 leg volume was 7702, volume of oedema was 34. I’m reading all of this off a spreadsheet used by the PT in California.

My surgery date was 11th December 2014. As you can see from my numbers, I devoted all my time and energy to getting my leg as small as possible prior to having the procedure done. There is no way I would have been able to devote that much time to my leg on a permanent basis. Since having the surgery, I no longer need to do all of that. Though, I do wear compression during the day, MLD once or twice a week. Some weeks I don’t get any MLD treatments (either my therapist is away or I’m away)..It’s so important that people don’t look at this procedure as a miracle cure. Anyone who is thinking of having the surgery done, should know there is a lot of work to be done on their part, it’s not just the surgeon. Compliance is mandatory! ….. over the next few years I hope to see more improvement as the nodes grow. Slow and steady wins the race..” Cindy

Lymphadema / lymphahell

I am reblogging this post to show just how difficult it is to look after a limb with lymphoedema… It takes a great deal of time and effort to keep it under control… Thanks for sharing with us

Mom (with cancer) blog: It's Because I Said So!

This is my impression of Dr. Zoidberg. It is my first bandaging for Stage II lymphadema. This is my impression of Dr. Zoidberg. It is my first bandaging for Stage II lymphadema.

Today was a typical day in my new normal: sleeping from 1 a.m. to 9 a.m. with many wakings due to lonely, mewing cat Benny, bad dreams and new screeching leg cramps; drifting in and out of sleep from 9 a.m. to noon; up until 5, then sleep until 9:30 when Tessa woke me to a fully prepared meal (made by her and Luka). That was a bonus and welcome treat. Now I will prepare for the new fun in my daily routine—bandaging my lymphadema arm.

The bandaged arm. Note my normal hand and how you can actually see bones there. The bandaged arm. Note my normal hand and how you can actually see bones there.

I had been managing the lymphadema in my right hand, arm, breast and trunk very well since it was diagnosed in November last year. Twice daily self MLD (manual lymphatic drainage) massage, meticulous…

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Cindy.. 8 months post surgery with Dr Granzow

imageThis is a new update from Cindy after her surgery with Dr Granzow in December 2014. Always great to hear of people’s progress as this is a very slow process waiting to see results!! Any changes are good changes and give hope to others.

 

“Just got back from my post-op appointment with Dr. Granzow (in California). As I said, I was supposed to see him in June, but a personal loss prevented me from making that appointment. I am 8 months out from my December 2014 surgery. I feel wonderful. I am not using any nighttime compression. My right leg (the lymphedema one) is smaller in some areas than my left leg. There is no pitting. The overall volume difference between the right and left leg is 34 mil. In January 2014, the difference was over a 1000 mil. Unfortunately, around my knee area I accumulated excess fats and proteins under the skin. It is not fibrotic and it is not fluid, it’s just there. There is not enough there to warrant any type of lipo to remove it. I am still wearing my custom garment (Elvarex class 3) during the day and receiving MLD twice a week. I’ve chosen to be very conservative and let my lymphatic system really have time to heal. My plan is to cut back on MLD to once a week, then in a few weeks not wear any compression on Saturdays. As long as I have no swelling, I will maintain that for 6 or more months. Then I will go without compression on weekends. I’ve lived with lymphedema for 5 years, I am going to do everything possible to get the maximum benefit from this surgery. I sincerely believe that if I take it slow and not overwhelm my lymphatic system, I will one day be able to be out of compression more than I am in it. That is my longterm goal!

I flew for the first time in July. The plane ride was over 5 hours and I did not have any swelling (of course I was wearing my garment). Prior to the surgery, I was afraid to fly. Prior to the surgery, my leg still swelled even when wearing compression. I only started wearing a custom garment in November 2014. It was never suggested to me before. I always wore an off the shelf garment. I was led to believe custom garments were only for people who didn’t fit in off the shelf garment. False information!! I should have been in a flat knit from the very beginning. So much time is loss when you are trying to get treatment for lymphedema and that is a tragedy. Had things been addressed correctly, the fats and proteins would not have had a change to build up the way they did. Accessing MLD treatment is not always easy.

The psychological aspect of living with lymphedema is the hardest part (in my opinion). Always wondering what is going on under the skin. Praying the skin stays soft and pliable. Having to stay on top of it is exhausting. Ignoring it would be foolish.

Dr. Granzow and his staff are incredible. I know I am in very good hands. Any question I have is answered immediately. As incredible as it may sound, I am able to contact Dr. Granzow directly. My own research is what led me to Dr. Granzow. Being proactive is mandatory when you have lymphedema. Information doesn’t just come to you, you have to go out and find it yourself.” By Cindy

This is a link to Cindy’s surgery in December https://lymphnodetransplant.wordpress.com/2015/01/05/california-lymph-node-transfer/
Thanks so much Cindy for sharing your progress with others… Slow and steady wins the race!!! This surgery is not an instant fix and it can take a year to start to see the first signs of change and improvement. The new nodes grow very slowly so great patience is needed..

This blog does not replace advice and consultation with an experienced surgeon… Make sure to ask lots if questions and also find out about their pre and post surgery protocols…. Helen

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